Why You Shouldn’t Quit Sugar
Oct16

Why You Shouldn’t Quit Sugar

Have you considered quitting sugar but don’t know if you have the discipline to pull it off?

Are you thinking about cutting back on carbs but you don’t want to eliminate some of your favorite foods?

As with most things in life, quitting sugar isn’t one-size-fits-all. It might just be possible that you should consider other options rather than quitting sugar cold-turkey. But what other options do you have? Let’s explore this.

Food for Thought

I sometimes like to go against the “whole” grain. Especially when it seems like people aren’t thinking for themselves. A lot of people learn something new, hear it repeated ad nauseam, make assumptions, and then stop questioning things. Bad move. That’s where I come in. I like to speak plainly and honestly so you might make a more informed choice. It’s not that I have all the answers, but I do have a lot of questions, which leads to a great deal of critical reasoning, and that’s a good thing.

The truth is, some people shouldn’t give up sugar. Yes, yes, I know. In the nutritional-eating world, I’ve just committed a dozen sins. But somebody has to say what needs to be said.

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How Do I Define Sugar?
Oct08

How Do I Define Sugar?

If I’m going to cut sugar out of my diet, I need to be clear about what I mean by “sugar”. So I thought I’d explore this topic a little and figure out what the heck I mean when I say I’m “quitting sugar”. So here goes…

The Many Faces of Sugar

A quick search on planet Google, gave me some food for thought. The first form of sugar that I think of when I say “sugar” is granulated table sugar. Here’s what Wikipedia says about sugar:

“Sugar is a term for a class of edible crystalline carbohydrates, mainly sucrose, lactose, and fructose,[1] characterized by a sweet flavor. In food, sugars refer to all monosaccharides and disaccharides present in food, but excludes polyols,[2] while in its singular form, sugar normally refers to sucrose, which in its fully refined (or free sugar) form primarily comes from sugar cane and sugar beet, though is present in natural form in many carbohydrates. Other free sugars are used in industrial food preparation, but are usually known by more specific names—glucose, fructose or fruit sugar, high fructose corn syrup, etc.”

That’s a pretty good place to start, but how relevant will all of that be when I’m in a grocery store trying to decipher the nutrition labels I’m reading?

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